Add refs in mime type registration
authorGavin Carothers <gavin@carothers.name>
Fri, 10 Jun 2011 22:13:24 -0700
changeset 52 b51ff0660265
parent 51 a076f28b8811
child 53 a5c9124e22b6
Add refs in mime type registration
rdf-turtle/index.html
--- a/rdf-turtle/index.html	Fri Jun 10 22:09:36 2011 -0700
+++ b/rdf-turtle/index.html	Fri Jun 10 22:13:24 2011 -0700
@@ -809,8 +809,8 @@
           </p>
         </section>
 
-      <section id="sec-compared" class="informative">
-        <h3>Turtle compared</h2>
+      <section id="sec-compared">
+        <h2>Turtle compared</h2>
         <p>Turtle is related to a number of other languages.</p>
       <section id="sec-diff-ntriples" class="informative">
         <h2>Turtle compared to N-Triples (Informative)</h2>
@@ -914,7 +914,7 @@
           <dd><tt>charset</tt> — this parameter is required when transferring non-ASCII data. If present, the value of <tt>charset</tt> is always <tt>UTF-8</tt>.</dd>
 
           <dt>Encoding considerations:</dt>
-          <dd>The syntax of Turtle is expressed over code points in Unicode [<a href="#UNICODE">UNICODE</a>]. The encoding is always UTF-8 [<a href="#rfc3629">RFC3629</a>].</dd>
+          <dd>The syntax of Turtle is expressed over code points in Unicode [[!UNICODE]]. The encoding is always UTF-8 [[!RFC3629]].</dd>
           <dd>Unicode code points may also be expressed using an \uXXXX (U+0 to U+FFFF) or \UXXXXXXXX syntax (for U+10000 onwards) where X is a hexadecimal digit [0-9A-F]</dd>
           <dt>Security considerations:</dt>
           <dd>Turtle is a general-purpose assertion language; applications may evaluate given data to infer more assertions or to dereference URIs, invoking the security considerations of the scheme for that URI. Note in particular, the privacy issues in [<a href="#rfc3023">RFC3023</a>] section 10 for HTTP URIs. Data obtained from an inaccurate or malicious data source may lead to inaccurate or misleading conclusions, as well as the dereferencing of unintended URIs. Care must be taken to align the trust in consulted resources with the sensitivity of the intended use of the data; inferences of potential medical treatments would likely require different trust than inferences for trip planning.</dd>
@@ -922,8 +922,8 @@
           <dd>Turtle is used to express arbitrary application data; security considerations will vary by domain of use. Security tools and protocols applicable to text (e.g. PGP encryption, MD5 sum validation, password-protected compression) may also be used on Turtle documents. Security/privacy protocols must be imposed which reflect the sensitivity of the embedded information.</dd>
           <dd>Turtle can express data which is presented to the user, for example, RDF Schema labels. Application rendering strings retrieved from untrusted Turtle documents must ensure that malignant strings may not be used to mislead the reader. The security considerations in the media type registration for XML ([RFC3023] section 10) provide additional guidance around the expression of arbitrary data and markup.</dd>
           <dd>Turtle uses IRIs as term identifiers. Applications interpreting data expressed in Turtle should address the security issues of
-      <a class="norm" href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3987.txt">Internationalized Resource Identifiers (IRIs)</a> [<a href="#rfc3987">RFC3987</a>] Section 8, as well as
-      <a class="norm" href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3986.txt">Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax</a> [<a href="#rfc3986">RFC3986</a>] Section 7.</dd>
+      <a class="norm" href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3987.txt">Internationalized Resource Identifiers (IRIs)</a> [[!RFC3987]] Section 8, as well as
+      <a class="norm" href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3986.txt">Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax</a> [[!RFC3986]] Section 7.</dd>
 
           <dd>Multiple IRIs may have the same appearance. Characters in different scripts may 
     look similar (a Cyrillic &quot;&#1086;&quot; may appear similar to a Latin &quot;o&quot;). A character followed 
@@ -934,9 +934,9 @@
     Any person or application that is writing or interpreting data in Turtle must take care to use the IRI that matches the intended semantics, and avoid IRIs that make look similar.
     Further information about matching of similar characters can be found 
     in <a class="inform" href="http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr36/">Unicode Security 
-    Considerations</a> [<a href="#UNISEC">UNISEC</a>] and
+    Considerations</a> [[UNISEC]] and
     <a class="norm" href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3987.txt">Internationalized Resource 
-    Identifiers (IRIs)</a> [<a href="#rfc3987">RFC3987</a>] Section 8.
+    Identifiers (IRIs)</a> [[RFC3987]] Section 8.
 
     <[email protected]@ no security considerations section at this time. @@
     See Turtle - Terse RDF Triple Language appendix X, <a href="#security">Security Considerations</a>