updated LD glossary per feedback from WG and fixed comments mailing list misconfig
authorhyland
Fri, 22 Mar 2013 17:57:42 -0400
changeset 423 7739324cc52a
parent 422 223f5e88b9f4
child 424 130a2573bf55
updated LD glossary per feedback from WG and fixed comments mailing list misconfig
glossary/index.html
glossary/respec-config.js
glossary/respec-ref.js
--- a/glossary/index.html	Wed Mar 20 11:34:28 2013 +0100
+++ b/glossary/index.html	Fri Mar 22 17:57:42 2013 -0400
@@ -49,13 +49,7 @@
 <p class="highlight">&#9734;&#9734;&#9734;&#9734;&#9734;&nbsp;<b>All of the above and links to other Linked Open Data.</b>
 </p>
 <p>
-An easy to read graphic for explaining the 5 Star Linked Data model may be seen on the <a href="http://www.cafepress.com/w3c_shop">5 Star Linked Open Data mug</a>.  One reads both green labels for <a href="#linked-open-data">Linked Open Data</a>, or neither green label for <a href="#linked-data">Linked Data</a>.  
-</p>
-</section>
-
-<section>
-<h4>5 Star Linked Data Diagram</h4>
-<a href="http://5stardata.info/" target="_blank">5 Open Data diagram</a> is a graphical representation of each of the 5 Star techniques as described by Tim Berners-Lee.
+An easy to read graphic for explaining the 5 Star Linked Data model may be seen on the <a href="http://www.cafepress.com/w3c_shop">5 Star Linked Open Data mug</a>.  One reads both green labels for <a href="#linked-open-data">Linked Open Data</a>, or neither green label for <a href="#linked-data">Linked Data</a>.  The <a href="http://5stardata.info/" target="_blank">5 Open Data diagram</a> is a graphical representation of each of the 5 Star techniques as described by Tim Berners-Lee.
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -85,7 +79,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Closed World</h4>
-Closed world is a concept from Artificial Intelligence and refers to a model of uncertainty that an agent assumes about the external world. In a closed world, the agent presumes that what is not known to be true must be false. This is a common assumption underlying relational databases, most forms of logical programming. See also [<a href="#open-world">Open World</a>].
+Closed world is a concept from Artificial Intelligence and refers to a model of uncertainty that an agent assumes about the external world. In a closed world, the agent presumes that what is not known to be true must be false. This is a common assumption underlying relational databases, most forms of logical programming. See also <a href="#open-world">Open World</a>.
 </section>
 
 <section >
@@ -95,12 +89,12 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Conneg</h4>
-Abbreviated term for content negotiation. See also [<a href="#content-negotiation">Content Negotiation</a>].
+Abbreviated term for content negotiation. See also <a href="#content-negotiation">Content Negotiation</a>.
 </section>
 
 <section>
 <h4>Content Negotiation</h4>
-Content negotiation, often called "conneg", refers to a phase in establishing a network connection. It is a mechanism for selecting the appropriate representation when servicing a request. The representation of entities in any response can be negotiated (including error responses). See also [<a href="http://www.w3.org/Protocols/HTTP/1.1/rfc2616bis/draft-lafon-rfc2616bis-03.html#content.negotiation" target="blank">RFC 2616b</a>]. See also [<a href="#connection">Connection</a>]. 
+Content negotiation, often called "conneg", refers to a phase in establishing a network connection. It is a mechanism for selecting the appropriate representation when servicing a request. The representation of entities in any response can be negotiated (including error responses). See also [<a href="http://www.w3.org/Protocols/HTTP/1.1/rfc2616bis/draft-lafon-rfc2616bis-03.html#content.negotiation" target="blank">HTTP Protocol 1.1</a>]. See also <a href="#connection">Connection</a>. 
 </section>
 
 <section >
@@ -140,7 +134,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Data Modeling</h4>
[email protected]@[email protected]@ 
+Data modeling is a process used to define and analyze data requirements for an information system.  In the context of Linked Data Modeling, it is a process that involves professional data modelers working closely with business stakeholders to define and document implicit and explicit  relationships.  Linked Data modeling applies formal Linked Data modeling techniques based on <a href="#linked-data-principles">Linked Data Principles</a>.
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -151,7 +145,6 @@
 <section >
 <h4>DBpedia</h4>
 DBpedia is a community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make it available on the Web. DBpedia is often depicted as a hub for the <a href="#data-cloud">Data Cloud</a>.  An RDF representation of the metadata derived from Wikipedia is made available for SPARQL queries and linking to other datasets on the Web.  DBpedia also provides a human readable version of the structured content.  For example, the human readable version of Linked Data for the color "Red" is found on DBpedia at <a href="http://dbpedia.org/page/Red">http://dbpedia.org/page/Red</a>.  See also [<a href="#curl">curl</a>].
-
 </section >
 
 <section>
@@ -166,7 +159,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>DCAT</h4>
-Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT) is an RDF vocabulary. It is designed to facilitate interoperability between data catalogs published on the Web. See also [<a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/vocab-dcat/" target="_blank">Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT)</a>].
+Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT) is an RDF vocabulary. It is designed to facilitate interoperability between data catalogs published on the Web. See also <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/vocab-dcat/" target="_blank">Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT)</a>.
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -191,7 +184,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Dublin Core Metadata Element Set</h4>
-Dublin Core Metadata Element Set refers to a <a href="#vocabulary">vocabulary</a> of fifteen properties for use in resource descriptions, such as may be found in a library card catalog (creator, publisher, etc).  The Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, also known as "DC Elements", is the most commonly used vocabulary for Linked Data applications. See also [<a href="http://dublincore.org/documents/dces/"> Dublin Core Element Set, Version 1.1 Specification.</a>] [<a href="#dublin-core-metadata-initiative" target="_blank">DCMI</a>]
+Dublin Core Metadata Element Set refers to a <a href="#vocabulary">vocabulary</a> of fifteen properties for use in resource descriptions, such as may be found in a library card catalog (creator, publisher, etc).  The Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, also known as "DC Elements", is the most commonly used vocabulary for Linked Data applications. See also <a href="http://dublincore.org/documents/dces/"> Dublin Core Element Set, Version 1.1 Specification.</a> [<a href="#dublin-core-metadata-initiative" target="_blank">DCMI</a>]
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -216,14 +209,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Graph</h4>
-Graph refers to a mathematical structure consisting of a collection of objects, represented by "nodes", and connected by “edges” (also called links), to denote inter-relationships between them. It is well established as the field of Graph Theory.  See also [<a href="#directed-graph">Directed Graph</a>].
-</section>
-
-<section>
-<h4>Hash URI Pattern</h4>
-<p class='todo'>To Discuss and adopt by the Group (cf. Dave proposition)</p>
-In creating and publishing Linked Data a key design decision is the pattern of URIs to use for the resources in the data. One aspect of that decision is whether to use "hash" URIs (URIs which end in a '#fragid' fragment identifier) or "slash" URIs (no fragment identifier). Hash URIs offer a simple way to separate the URI for the thing from the URL for a data document describing the thing. They are convenient when publishing small files 
-of resources (e.g. small vocabularies) but limit implementation options and extensibility (because the fragment identifier is never seen by the data server). See also [<a href="#slash-uri-pattern">Slash URI Pattern</a>]
+Graph refers to a mathematical structure consisting of a collection of objects, represented by "nodes", and connected by “edges” (also called links), to denote inter-relationships between them. It is well established as the field of Graph Theory.  See also <a href="#directed-graph">Directed Graph</a>.
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -273,8 +259,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Linked Data</h4>
-Linked data refers to a set of best practices for creating, publishing and announcing structured data on the Web. See [<a href="#linked-data-principles">Linked Data Principles</a>] Linked Data is intended for access by both humans and machines.  Linked Data is <b>not</b> the same as <a href="rdf">RDF</a>, rather Linked Data uses the RDF family of standards for data interchange ( RDF/XML, N3, Turtle and N-Triples) and query (SPARQL). Linked Data can be published by an person or organization behind the firewall or on the public Web.  If Linked Data is published on the public Web, it is generally called <em><a href="#linked-open-data">Linked Open Data</a></em>. 
-
+Linked data refers to a set of best practices for creating, publishing and announcing structured data on the Web. See [<a href="#linked-data-principles">Linked Data Principles</a>] Linked Data is intended for access by both humans and machines.  Linked Data is not the same as <a href="rdf">RDF</a>, rather Linked Data uses the RDF family of standards for data interchange ( RDF/XML, N3, Turtle and N-Triples) and query (SPARQL). Linked Data can be published by an person or organization behind the firewall or on the public Web.  If Linked Data is published on the public Web, it is generally called <em><a href="#linked-open-data">Linked Open Data</a></em>. 
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -283,6 +268,11 @@
 </section>
 
 <section>
+<h4>Linked Data Platform 1.0</h4>
+A set of best practices and simple approach for a read-write Linked Data architecture, based on HTTP access to web resources that describe their state using the RDF data model. The Linked Data Platform describes the use of HTTP for accessing, updating, creating and deleting resources from servers that expose their resources as Linked Data. It provides some new rules as well as clarifications and extensions of the four rules of Linked Data [LINKED-DATA].  See also [LDP_1.0]
+</section>
+
+<section>
 <h4>Linked Data Principles</h4>
 Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the Web and initiator of the <a href="http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html" target="_blank"> Linked Data</a> project, proposed the following principles upon which Linked Data is based:
 <ol>
@@ -301,7 +291,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Linked Open Data Cloud</h4>
-The Linked Data Cloud represents <b>interconnected</b> datasets that have been published as Linked Data on the public Web.  See also: <a href="#data-cloud">Data Cloud</a>, <a href="#linked-open-data-cloud-diagram">Linked Open Data Cloud diagram</a>
+The Linked Data Cloud represents interconnected datasets that have been published as Linked Data on the public Web.  See also: <a href="#data-cloud">Data Cloud</a>, <a href="#linked-open-data-cloud-diagram">Linked Open Data Cloud diagram</a>
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -399,7 +389,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Persistent Uniform Resource Locator</h4>
-A persistent uniform resource locator (PURL) is a <a href="uniform-resource=locator">uniform resource locator</a> (URL) that is used to redirect to the location of the requested web resource. PURLs redirect HTTP clients using HTTP status codes. PURLs are used to curate the URL resolution process, thus solving the problem of transitory URIs in location-based URI schemes like HTTP.  Thus, a user of a PURL always uses the same Web address, even though the resource in question may have moved.  Note, an expansion of PURL that is sometimes found is "permanent uniform resource locator" however that is incorrect as it does not capture the key concept of <em>persistence</em>.
+A persistent uniform resource locator (PURL) is a <a href="uniform-resource=locator">uniform resource locator</a> (URL) that is intended to remain the same over the course of time, regardless of changes to the implementing technology, the ownership of the resource or the contents of the representation.  There are several types of PURLs, which are differentiated by the HTTP status code they return.  PURLs are used to curate the URL resolution process, thus solving the problem of transitory URIs in location-based URI schemes like HTTP. Thus, a user of a PURL always uses the same Web address, even though the resource in question may have moved or changed ownership.  A PURL might redirect to the new location or return content proxied from the new location.
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -423,6 +413,11 @@
 </section>
 
 <section>
+<h4>PURL</h4>
+See <a href="#persistent-uniform-resource-locator">Persistent Uniform Resource Locator</a>
+</section>
+
+<section>
 <h4>Quad Store</h4>
 Quad Store is a colloquial phrase for an RDF database that stores RDF triples plus an additional element of information, often used to collect statements into groups. This notion has been clarified and standardized in <a href="#sparql">SPARQL</a> in the form of <b>RDF Datasets</b>
 </section>
@@ -459,7 +454,7 @@
 
 <section>
 <h4>Resource Description Framework</h4>
-Resource Description Framework (RDF), is a general-purpose language for representing information in the Web.  RDF provides a common model for Linked Data and is well suited for the representation of data on the Web.  RDF is <b>not</b> a data format, rather a model for expressing relationships between arbitrary data elements that may be represented in a variety of standard formats.  RDF is based on the idea of identifying things using Web identifiers or <a href="#uris>HTTP URIs"</a>, and describing resources in terms of simple properties and property values. A single RDF statement describes two things and a relationship between them. This enables RDF to represent simple statements about resources as a graph of nodes and arcs representing the resources, and their properties and values.  Linked Data developers call the three elements in an RDF statement the <em>subject</em>, the <em>predicate</em> and the <em>object</em>. See also [<h ref="http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-concepts/">Resource Description Framework (RDF): Concepts and Abstract Syntax</a>
+Resource Description Framework (RDF), is a general-purpose language for representing information in the Web.  RDF provides a common model for Linked Data and is well suited for the representation of data on the Web.  RDF is <b>not</b> a data format, rather a model for expressing relationships between arbitrary data elements that may be represented in a variety of standard formats.  RDF is based on the idea of identifying things using Web identifiers or <a href="#uris">HTTP URIs</a>, and describing resources in terms of simple properties and property values. A single RDF statement describes two things and a relationship between them. This enables RDF to represent simple statements about resources as a graph of nodes and arcs representing the resources, and their properties and values.  Linked Data developers call the three elements in an RDF statement the <em>subject</em>, the <em>predicate</em> and the <em>object</em>. See also [<h ref="http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf11-concepts/">RDF 1.1 Concepts and Abstract Syntax</a>
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -474,8 +469,8 @@
 <section>
 
 <h4>RDF-JSON</h4>
-<p class='todo'>To vote: Remove this item (cf. Dave suggestion)</p>
-A concrete syntax in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) ([[RFC4627]]) for RDF as defined in the RDF Concepts and Abstract Syntax ([[!RDF-CONCEPTS]]) W3C Recommendation.  An RDF-JSON document serializes such a set of RDF triples as a series of nested data structures.  See also [<a href="https://dvcs.w3.org/hg/rdf/raw-file/default/rdf-json/index.html"> RDF 1.1  JSON Serialization document draft</a>]
+<p class='todo'>In favor of removing this item: DaveR. In favor of keeping: Bhyland. To discuss</p>
+A concrete syntax in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) [[RFC4627]] for RDF as defined in the RDF Concepts and Abstract Syntax [[!RDF-CONCEPTS]] W3C Recommendation.  An RDF-JSON document serializes such a set of RDF triples as a series of nested data structures.  See also [<a href="https://dvcs.w3.org/hg/rdf/raw-file/default/rdf-json/index.html"> RDF 1.1  JSON Serialization document draft</a>]
 </section>
 
 <section>
@@ -554,12 +549,6 @@
 </section>
 
 <section>
-<h4>Slash URI Pattern</h4>
-<p class='todo'>To vote by the Group (cf. Dave proposal)</p>
-In creating and publishing Linked Data a key design decision is the pattern of URIs to use for the resources in the data. One aspect of that decision is whether to use "hash" URIs (URIs which end in a '#fragid' fragment identifier) or "slash" URIs (no fragment identifier). Slash URIs provide maximum flexibility since the data server will see the full URI when it is dereferenced.
-</section>
-
-<section>
 <h4>SPARQL</h4>
 Simple Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) defines a standard query language and data access protocol for use with the RDF [[!SPARQL]].  Just as SQL is used to query relational data, SPARQL is used to query an RDF database. SPARQL 1.1 [[!SPARQL-11]] specification allows more set of operations and queries on a RDF graph content on the Web or in a RDF store.
 </section>
@@ -586,7 +575,7 @@
 
 <section >
 <h4>Taxonomy</h4>
- Taxonomy is a formal representation of relationships between items in a hierarchical structure. Also see [<a href="#ontology">Ontology</a>].
+ Taxonomy is a formal representation of relationships between items in a hierarchical structure. Also see <a href="#ontology">Ontology</a>.
 </section >
 
 <section >
@@ -650,6 +639,11 @@
 </section>
 
 <section>
+<h4>VoID</h4>
+VoID is an <a href="#rdf-schema">RDF Schema</a> vocabulary for expressing metadata about RDF datasets. It is intended as a bridge between the publishers and users of RDF data, with applications ranging from data discovery to cataloging and archiving of datasets.  VoID can be used to express general metadata based on Dublin Core, access metadata, structural metadata, and links between datasets. [VOID-GUIDE]
+</section>
+
+<section>
 <h4>Web 2.0</h4>
  A colloquial description of the part of the World Wide Web that implements social networking, blogs, user comments and ratings and related human-centered activities.
 </section >
--- a/glossary/respec-config.js	Wed Mar 20 11:34:28 2013 +0100
+++ b/glossary/respec-config.js	Fri Mar 22 17:57:42 2013 -0400
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 var respecConfig = {
     // specification status (e.g. WD, LCWD, NOTE, etc.). If in doubt use ED.
     specStatus:           "WD",
-    publishDate:          "2013-03-19",
+    publishDate:          "2013-03-22",
     //copyrightStart:       "2011",
 
     // the specification's short name, as in http://www.w3.org/TR/short-name/
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@
     wgURI:        "http://www.w3.org/2011/gld/",
 
     // name of the public mailing to which comments are due
-    wgPublicList: "public-gld-wg",
+    wgPublicList: "public-gld-comments",
 
     // URI of the patent status for this WG, for Rec-track documents
     // !!!! IMPORTANT !!!!
--- a/glossary/respec-ref.js	Wed Mar 20 11:34:28 2013 +0100
+++ b/glossary/respec-ref.js	Fri Mar 22 17:57:42 2013 -0400
@@ -1,18 +1,23 @@
 var preProc = {
       apply:  function(c) {
                 // extend the bibliography entries
-		berjon.biblio["PROV"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/prov/XGR-prov-20101214/\">Provenance Final Report</a></cite> Yolanda Gil; et al.  08 December 2010. W3C Incubator Group Report. URL: http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/prov/XGR-prov-20101214/ ";
-		berjon.biblio["RDF-Primer"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-primer/\">RDF-Primer</a></cite>, Frank Manola, Eric Miller (Editors),  10 February 2004. W3C Recommendation. URL: <a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-primer/\">http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-primer/</a>";
-                berjon.biblio["MICRODATA"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/microdata/\">Microdata</a></cite> Ian Hickson; et al. 04 March 2010. W3C Working Draft. URL: http://www.w3.org/TR/microdata/ ";
-                berjon.biblio["XHTML-RDFA"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-rdfa/\">XHTML+RDFa</a></cite> Manu Sporny; et al. 31 March 2011. W3C Working Draft. URL: http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-rdfa/ ";
-                berjon.biblio["HTML-RDFA"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://dev.w3.org/html5/rdfa/\">HTML+RDFa</a></cite> Manu Sporny; et al. 24 May 2011. W3C Working Draft. URL: http://dev.w3.org/html5/rdfa/ ";
-                berjon.biblio["LD-FOR-DEVELOPERS"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://manning.com/dwood/\">Linked Data: Structured Data on the Web.</a> David Wood, Marsh Zaidman, Luke Ruth, with Michael Hausenblas</cite>; 2013 URL: <a href=\"http://www.manning.com/dwood\">http://www.manning.com/dwood/</a>";
-                berjon.biblio["HOWTO-LODP"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://linkeddatabook.com/editions/1.0/\">Linked Data: Evolving the Web into a Global Data Space.</a> 2011, Chris Bizer, Tom Health URL: <a href=\"http://linkeddata.org/docs/how-to-publish\">http://linkeddatabook.com/editions/1.0/</a>";
-                berjon.biblio["COOL-SWURIS"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/cooluris/\">Cool URIs for the Semantic Web</a></cite>, L. Sauermann and R. Cyganiak, W3C Interest Group Note 03 December 2008. URL: <a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/cooluris/\">http://www.w3.org/TR/cooluris/</a>";
-                berjon.biblio["VOID-GUIDE"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/void/\">Describing Linked Datasets with the VoID Vocabulary</a></cite>, K. Alexander, R. Cyganiak, M. Hausenblas, and J. Zhao, W3C Interest Group Note 03 March 2011. URL: http://www.w3.org/TR/void/";
-                berjon.biblio["RDFA-CORE-PROFILE"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/profile/rdfa-1.1\">RDFa Core Default Profile</a></cite>, I. Herman, W3C RDF Web Applications Working Group 02 June 2011. URL: http://www.w3.org/profile/rdfa-1.1";
-                berjon.biblio["XHTML-RDFA-PROFILE"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/profile/html-rdfa-1.1\">HTML+RDFa Core Default Profile</a></cite>, I. Herman, W3C RDF Web Applications Working Group 24 May 2011. URL: http://www.w3.org/profile/html-rdfa-1.1";
-                berjon.biblio["RFC2616"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616.html\">Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1</a></cite>, R. Fielding; et al. June 1999. Internet RFC 2616. URL: <a href=\"http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616.html\">http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616.html</a>."; 
+		berjon.biblio["LINKED-DATA"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html/\">LINKED-DATA</a></cite>, Tim Berners-Lee. Linked Data Design Issues. 27 July 2006. W3C-Internal Document. URL: <a href=\"http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html/\">http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html</a>";
+
+      berjon.biblio["HOWTO-LODP"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://linkeddatabook.com/editions/1.0/\">Linked Data: Evolving the Web into a Global Data Space.</a> 2011, Chris Bizer, Tom Health URL: <a href=\"http://linkeddata.org/docs/how-to-publish\">http://linkeddatabook.com/editions/1.0/</a>";  
+		
+		berjon.biblio["LD-FOR-DEVELOPERS"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://manning.com/dwood/\">Linked Data: Structured Data on the Web.</a> David Wood, Marsh Zaidman, Luke Ruth, with Michael Hausenblas</cite>; 2013 URL: <a href=\"http://www.manning.com/dwood\">http://www.manning.com/dwood/</a>";
+  
+        berjon.biblio["LDP_1.0"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/2013/WD-ldp-20130307/\">Linked Data Platform 1.0.</a></cite> Steve Speicher, John Arwe. 07 March 2013. W3C Working Draft, Linked Data Platform Working Group. URL: <a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/ldp/\">http://www.w3.org/TR/ldp/</a>";
+        
+        berjon.biblio["XHTML-RDFA"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-rdfa/\">XHTML+RDFa</a></cite> Manu Sporny; et al. 31 March 2011. W3C Working Draft. URL: http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-rdfa/ ";        
+ 
+        berjon.biblio["HTML-RDFA"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://dev.w3.org/html5/rdfa/\">HTML+RDFa</a></cite> Manu Sporny; et al. 24 May 2011. W3C Working Draft. URL: http://dev.w3.org/html5/rdfa/ ";
+        
+        berjon.biblio["COOL-SWURIS"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/cooluris/\">Cool URIs for the Semantic Web</a></cite>, L. Sauermann and R. Cyganiak, W3C Interest Group Note 03 December 2008. URL: <a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/cooluris/\">http://www.w3.org/TR/cooluris/</a>";
+        berjon.biblio["VOID-GUIDE"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/void/\">Describing Linked Datasets with the VoID Vocabulary</a></cite>, K. Alexander, R. Cyganiak, M. Hausenblas, and J. Zhao, W3C Interest Group Note 03 March 2011. URL: http://www.w3.org/TR/void/";
+        berjon.biblio["RDFA-CORE-PROFILE"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/profile/rdfa-1.1\">RDFa Core Default Profile</a></cite>, I. Herman, W3C RDF Web Applications Working Group 02 June 2011. URL: http://www.w3.org/profile/rdfa-1.1";
+        berjon.biblio["XHTML-RDFA-PROFILE"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/profile/html-rdfa-1.1\">HTML+RDFa Core Default Profile</a></cite>, I. Herman, W3C RDF Web Applications Working Group 24 May 2011. URL: http://www.w3.org/profile/html-rdfa-1.1";
+        berjon.biblio["RFC2616"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616.html\">Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1</a></cite>, R. Fielding; et al. June 1999. Internet RFC 2616. URL: <a href=\"http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616.html\">http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616.html</a>."; 
 		berjon.biblio["RFC3986"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986\">Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax</a></cite>, Berners-Lee, et al. January 2005. Internet RFC 3986. URL: <a href=\"http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986\">http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986</a>.";
                 berjon.biblio["RFC2396"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2396\">Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax</a></cite>, Berners-Lee, T., Fielding, R.T., and L. Masinter,   August 1998. Internet RFC 2396. URL: <a href=\"http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2396\">http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2396</a>";
 		 berjon.biblio["TURTLE-TR"] = "<cite><a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/2013/CR-turtle-20130219/\">Turtle: Terse RDF Triple Language</a></cite>,Eric Prud'hommeaux, Gavin Carothers,  19 February 2013. W3C Candidate Recommendation. URL: <a href=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/2013/CR-turtle-20130219/\">http://www.w3.org/TR/2013/CR-turtle-20130219/</a>";