tr.html
changeset 52 59ee28366bf8
parent 51 01daf4bcc1fd
child 53 2c13766abd84
--- a/tr.html	Fri Dec 06 09:42:22 2013 +0100
+++ b/tr.html	Fri Dec 06 09:47:59 2013 +0100
@@ -308,21 +308,21 @@
           class="rfc2119">should</em> include the reasons why the change in
         expectations comes at so late a stage.</dd>
       <dt><a name="RecsW3C" id="RecsW3C">W3C Recommendation (REC)</a></dt>
-      <dd>A W3C Recommendation is a specification or set of normative guidelines
-        that, after extensive consensus-building, has received the endorsement
-        of W3C Members and the Director. W3C recommends the wide deployment of
-        its Recommendations as standards for the Web.</dd>
+      <dd>A W3C Recommendation is a specification or set of guidelines or
+        requirements that, after extensive consensus-building, has received the
+        endorsement of W3C Members and the Director. W3C recommends the wide
+        deployment of its Recommendations as standards for the Web.</dd>
       <dt><a name="WGNote" id="WGNote">Working Group Note, Interest Group Note
           (NOTE) </a></dt>
       <dd>A Working Group Note or Interest Group Note is published by a
         chartered Working Group or Interest Group to provide a stable reference
-        for a document that is not intended to be a normative specification, but
-        is nevertheless useful. Examples include supporting documents such as
-        Use case and Requirements documents, Design Principles that explain what
-        the Working Group was trying to achieve with a specification, or 'Good
-        Practices" documents. A Working Group <em class="rfc2119">may</em> also
-        publish a specification as a Note if they stop work without producing a
-        Recommendation. A Working Group or Interest Group <em class="rfc2119">may</em>
+        for a document that is not intended to be a specification requiring
+        conformance, but is nevertheless useful. Examples include supporting
+        documents such as Use case and Requirements documents, Design Principles
+        that explain what the Working Group was trying to achieve with a
+        specification, or 'Good Practices" documents. A Working Group <em class="rfc2119">may</em>
+        also publish a specification as a Note if they stop work without
+        producing a Recommendation. A Working Group or Interest Group <em class="rfc2119">may</em>
         publish a Note with or without its prior publication as a Working Draft.</dd>
       <dt><a name="RescindedRec" id="RescindedRec">Rescinded Recommendation</a></dt>
       <dd>A Rescinded Recommendation is an entire Recommendation that W3C no
@@ -655,8 +655,8 @@
         Group Note</a></h3>
     <p>Working Groups and Interest Groups publish material that is not a formal
       specification as Notes. This may include supporting documentation for a
-      specification, such as requirements, use cases, non-normative good
-      practices and the like.</p>
+      specification, such as requirements, use cases, good practices and the
+      like.</p>
     <p>Work on a technical report <em class="rfc2119">may</em> cease at any
       time. Work <em class="rfc2119 new">should</em> cease if W3C or a Working
       Group determines that it cannot productively carry the work any further.
@@ -688,7 +688,7 @@
         Policy</a> [<a href="http://www.w3.org/2005/10/Process-20051014/refs.html#ref-patentpolicy">PUB33</a>].</p>
     <h3>7.6 <a name="rec-modify" id="rec-modify">Modifying a W3C Recommendation</a></h3>
     <p>The following sections discuss the management of errors and the process
-      for making normative changes to a Recommendation.</p>
+      for making changes to a Recommendation.</p>
     <h4>7.6.1 <a name="errata" id="errata">Errata Management</a></h4>
     <p>Tracking errors is an important part of a Working Group's ongoing care of
       a Recommendation; for this reason, the scope of a Working Group charter
@@ -708,14 +708,12 @@
       see the Team's <a href="http://www.w3.org/Guide/pubrules">Publication
         Rules</a>.</p>
     <p>A correction is first "proposed" by the Working Group. A correction
-      becomes normative by the process described below.</p>
+      becomes part of the Recommendation by the process described below.</p>
     <p>A Working Group <span class="rfc2119">should</span> keep their errata
       pages up-to-date, as errors are reported by readers and implementers. A
       Working Group <span class="rfc2119">must</span> report errata page
-      changes to interested parties, notably when corrections are proposed or
-      become normative, according to the Team's requirements. For instance, the
-      Team might set up a mailing list per Recommendation where a Working Group
-      reports changes to an errata page.</p>
+      changes to interested parties, notably when corrections are proposed or incorporated
+      into an Edited Recommendation, according to the Team's requirements.</p>
     <h4>7.6.2 <a name="correction-classes" id="correction-classes">Classes of
         Changes to a Recommendation</a></h4>
     <p>This document distinguishes the following classes of changes to a